Sirtfood Science

sirtfood scienceLooking At Sirtfood Science

Consuming foods rich in “sirtuin activators” — including red wine, kale, arugula, buckwheat, apples, blueberries, capers, red onions, walnuts, strawberries, extra virgin olive oil, parsley, dark chocolate, green tea, and coffee among others — will upregulate the expression of SIRT genes, increasing the producing sirtuin proteins that will retard the accumulation of fat. You’ve likely heard of the most famous of the sirtuin activators: Resveratrol, a compound found in red wine.

In 2003, David A. Sinclair, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, published the results of the first study to suggest that resveratrol slows aging in a way similar to calorie restriction — that is, by stimulating the SIRT2 gene, which promotes DNA stability, increases the production of the body’s own antioxidants, and puts the brakes on fat production. Since then, many more sirtuin activators (and the foods in which they’re found) have been identified in sirtfood science studies, and the list of potential benefits from consuming them keeps growing.

Potential Benefits of the Sirtfood Diet

Sirtuins have also been linked to the functioning of the nervous, cardiovascular, and immune systems, as well as liver, bone, muscle, stem cell, and tissue regeneration, according to 2014 article “The Controversial World of Sirtuins” published in the journal Drug Discovery Today: Technologies. Sirtuins have also been credited with helping to fight many age-related diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and arthritis.

Sirtfood science studies have also revealed that sirtuins can reduce inflammation, hypoxic stress (as might be caused by poor circulation), heat shock, and genotoxic (DNA damaging) stress, according to 2011 article “Sirtuins at a Glance” in the Journal of Cell Science, which notes that inflammation is a major cause of aging and aging-related diseases.

If this all sounds confusing, you can download the “Official Sirtfood Diet Planner” app from Google Play. The app kicks off your “Sirtification” with a “7-Day Sirtfood Challenge,” and includes a customizable shopping list, a weight loss tracker, a daily meal planner, and recipes that incorporate the top 20 sirtfoods. Participates who complete the challenge can move on to the 14-day maintenance phase.

Does the Sirtfood Diet Work?

So far, the diet has received ringing endorsements from many celebrities, most of whom are British, including (reportedly) Grammy-winning music artist Adele, model Jodie Kidd, TV cook Lorraine Pascale, boxers David Haye and Anthony Ogogo, Olympic sailor Ben Ainslie, and rugby player James Haskell.

Matcha Green Tea: A Sirtfood Superfood to Supercharge You!

matchaWhat is Matcha?

Matcha (pronounced MA-cha), has been part of the Japanese culture since the 12th century. It is one of the most prized beverages in Japan. Matcha green tea differs from regular green tea due to the way the leaves are produced. All teas originate from the same plant known as Camellia sinensis, which is a shrub native to China. The shrub produces all types of leaves for tea, including white, green oolong, black, and pu-erh tea. Depending on the region and how they’re processed, these types of teas differ in their antioxidant content, their caffeine content and other nutritional properties.

How is Matcha Different  From Regular Green Tea?

Matcha is a type of tea that’s far less processed than regular green tea because the leaves are never heated and kept under shade to preserve the natural nutrients found in the leaves. Regular green tea goes through much more processing during production and is also left to dry in the sun, versus in the shade like matcha is. Matcha green tea is a bright, green powder that’s also stirred into warmed liquid instead of boiling and brewing methods used when making regular green tea. Since you’re consuming the leaves whole in a milder powder with matcha, you’re also taking in more nutrients than just throwing the leaves away in a tea bag or straining them out in a strainer as you would with regular tea.

How Does Matcha Taste?

Like all green tea, matcha has slightly grass notes, but with a much richer, almost buttery flavor. It’s especially tasty when blended with some non-dairy milk and stevia, along with a little vanilla extract.

Superfood Benefits of Matcha:

  • Matcha green tea far outranks even some of the most powerful superfoods we know of today. It contains over six times the antioxidants in goji berries, seven times the antioxidants in dark chocolate, 17 times more antioxidants than blueberries, and 60 times the antioxidants found in spinach. And that’s just in one teaspoon!
  • Matcha contains  137 times more of the popular antioxidant EGCG found in regular green tea. EGCG is a part of the antioxidant family known as catechins, which have been linked to better heart health, a healthy metabolism, and improved aging.
  • Matcha is a great tool to improve your workouts since it’s energizing and anti-inflammatory.
  • The beautiful bright green tea has even been found to prevent cancer because the antioxidants in the tea are so high, they help fight off immune system invaders known as free radicals.
  • Matcha is five times higher in chlorophyll than regular tea. Chlorophyll is the green pigment found in plants that can help give you clear skin, protect your blood and heart, and also help prevent joint inflammation.
  • One glass of matcha green tea is equal to the amount of nutrition found in 10 cups of regular green tea.
  • Matcha green tea has been found to raise the metabolism, provide a long stream of energy versus a crash you get with coffee, and possibly help with weight management. Of course matcha isn’t a replacement for an unhealthy diet, but it is a much smarter, holistic way to raise your metabolism and gain energy.
  • Matcha also lowers anxiety due to the high, raw amounts of L-theanine found in matcha. L-theanine is an amino acid that promotes a state of relaxation and is the reason regular green tea is thought of as a calming beverage.
  • Matcha only contains 35 milligrams of caffeine per teaspoon, which is almost a third less than a cup of regular black coffee.

Sounds pretty amazing for a tea, right? That’s because matcha, like all plant-based foods, has unique properties that make it special in its own light. Remember that matcha isn’t a quick-fix magic pill to perfect health, but it sure beats out other teas and is a better, less-processed option.

 Enjoy Matcha Green Tea:

Traditional use: Matcha can be enjoyed the same way you would use regular green tea, you just have to brew it a bit differently. Boil a cup and a half of water, pour it in your favorite tea mug, and let it sit for 3-5 minutes. Then whisk in 1/2 teaspoon of matcha green tea powder. You’ll notice it starts to foam a bit, and this is completely natural. You can also add a little non-dairy milk if you like, which will give it a creamier flavor. Or blend it all together in your blender to make it frothier like cafe-style beverages.

Other uses: Matcha is also amazing in a green smoothie. You can use it to replace your normal green superfood powder with a pinch, or just use it in any other regular smoothie. Since it’s so high in nutrition, you don’t need a lot of it to get the health benefits. A half to a whole teaspoon is plenty.

You can also use matcha in energy bites, vegan ice cream,truffles and even  bake brownies and cupcakes. Or, keep things simple and blend it with some ice and non-dairy milk to make an iced matcha latte. Get creative and see how you can incorporate matcha into your life!

Where to Find Matcha and What to Look For:

It’s important not to buy just any old brand of matcha tea. Many brands market matcha tea that aren’t true matcha. The better brands will be slightly pricier than cheap versions you find at the grocery store, and this indicates their higher quality. Check the label on all matcha you buy. It should only include 100 % matcha green tea leaves and preferably be organic and ceremonial grade, which indicates it’s produced in the same, minimally-processing method of green tea consumed in Japan and will ensure it contains no pesticides.

The color should also be a bright green, not a muddy greenish-brown color, which indicates it’s been more heavily processed or is a cheaper variety of matcha.

Most matcha is sold in 2-4 ounce containers and ranges anywhere from $15.00-$50.00 per container. These are definitely not cheap but will last at least three months if you use a half teaspoon per day.

 

 

 

Kale 5 Health Benefits

kaleKale is one of the recommended Sirtfoods.

It is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious plant foods in existence.

Kale is loaded with all sorts of beneficial compounds… some of which have powerful medicinal properties.

Here are 5 health benefits of kale, that are supported by science.

1. Kale is Among The Most Nutrient Dense Foods on The Planet

Before we get to all the benefits, let me briefly explain what kale is…

Kale is a popular vegetable, a member of the cabbage family.

It is related to cruciferous vegetables like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts.

There are many different types of kale. The leaves can be green or purple in color, and have either a smooth or curly shape.

The most common type of kale is called curly kale or Scots kale, which has green and curly leaves and a hard, fibrous stem.

A single cup of raw kale (about 67 grams or 2.4 ounces) contains (1):

  • Vitamin A: 206% of the RDA (from beta-carotene).
  • Vitamin K: 684% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin C: 134% of the RDA.
  • Vitamin B6: 9% of the RDA.
  • Manganese: 26% of the RDA.
  • Calcium: 9% of the RDA.
  • Copper: 10% of the RDA.
  • Potassium: 9% of the RDA.
  • Magnesium: 6% of the RDA.
  • Then it contains 3% or more of the RDA for Vitamin B1 (Thiamin), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (Niacin), Iron and Phosphorus.

This is coming with a total of 33 calories, 6 grams of carbs (2 of which are fiber) and 3 grams of protein.

Kale contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is the omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic acid.

Given the incredibly low calorie content, kale is among the most nutrient dense foods in existence. Eating more kale is a great way to dramatically increase the total nutrient content of your diet.

 

2. Kale is Loaded With Powerful Antioxidants Like Quercetin and Kaempferol

Kale, like other leafy greens, is very high in antioxidants.

This includes beta-carotene, vitamin C, as well as various flavonoids and polyphenols.

Antioxidants are substances that help counteract oxidative damage by free radicals in the body..

Oxidative damage is believed to be among the leading drivers of aging and many diseases, including cancer.

But many substances that happen to be antioxidants also have other important functions.

This includes the flavonoids quercetin and kaempferol, which are found in relatively large amounts in kale.

These substances have been studied intensely in test tubes and animal studies. They have powerful cardioprotective, blood pressure lowering, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-depressant and anti-cancer effects… to name a few.

3. It is an Excellent Source of Vitamin C

fresh-kale-in-a-brown-bag

Vitamin C is an important nutrient.

It is a water-soluble antioxidant that serves many vital functions in the body’s cells.

For example, it is necessary to synthesize collagen, the most abundant structural protein in the body.

Kale is much higher in vitamin C than most other vegetables, containing about 4.5 times much as spinach.

The truth is… kale is actually among the world’s best sources of Vitamin C. A cup of raw kale even contains more vitamin C than a whole orange.

4. Kale Can Help Lower Cholesterol, Which May Reduce The Risk of Heart Disease

Heart and Stethoscope

Cholesterol has many important functions in the body.

One of them, is being used to make bile acids, which are substances that help us digest fats.

The liver turns cholesterol into bile acids, which are then released into the digestive system whenever we eat a fatty meal.

When all the fat has been absorbed and the bile acids have served their purpose, they are reabsorbed into the bloodstream and used again.

Substances called bile acid sequestrants can bind bile acids in the digestive system and prevent them from being reabsorbed. This reduces the total amount of cholesterol in the body.

Guess what… kale actually contains bile acid sequestrants, which can lower cholesterol levels (11). This should lead to a reduced risk of heart disease over time.

One study found that daily consumption of kale juice for 12 weeks increased HDL (the “good”) cholesterol by 27% and lowered LDL levels by 10%, while also improving antioxidant status.

According to one study, steaming kale dramatically increases the bile acid binding effect. Steamed kale is actually 43% as potent as cholestyramine, a cholesterol lowering drug that functions in this way .

 

5. Kale is One of The World’s Best Sources of Vitamin K

Vitamin K is an important nutrient.

It is absolutely critical for blood clotting, and does this by “activating” certain proteins and giving them the ability to bind calcium.

The well known anticoagulant drug Warfarin actually works by blocking the function of this vitamin.

Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin K, with a single raw cup containing almost 7 times the recommended daily amount.

The form of vitamin K in kale is K1, which is different than vitamin K2. K2 is found in fermented soy foods and certain animal products. It helps prevent heart disease and osteoporosis.

Sirtfood-What are Medjool Dates?

medjoolMEDJOOL DATES are a type of tree fruit that originate in the Middle East and North Africa, but they can be cultivated with some success in a number of desert-like regions around the world. Dates in general make up an important part of Middle Eastern cuisine, but medjools particularly are prized for their large size, their sweet taste, and their juicy flesh even when dried. They are often enjoyed on their own as a snack or as a flavoring element within a larger meal or baked confection.

Difference from Other Sorts of Dates

There are many different varieties of dates, though all share some basic characteristics. They grow on date palm trees, for instance, and are native to hot, arid climates. Their fruit can be eaten fresh but is more commonly dried, which lengthens its lifespan and prevents early spoilage. Medjool dates are widely regarded as the “best” variety of dates. They are certainly the largest and are usually also the most expensive to buy. Many consumers believe that they have the richest flavor as well.

Medjools are often informally known as the “king of dates,” the “diamond of dates,” or the “crown jewel of dates” in reference to their elevated position. They are what is known as a “soft” date. The fruits are usually categorized as soft, dry, or semi-dry in reference to their texture and taste. Soft dates are usually considered to be the most exquisite in part because of how much harder they are to grow, as well as how much more susceptible they are to loss by birds and insects.

Taste Basics Of Medjool Dates

Most people describe medjool dates as having a rich, almost caramel-like taste, and mentions of honey and cinnamon are also common. They are usually served dried, but this drying happens naturally in most cases. The most traditional way to prepare dates of any kind is to allow them to ripen and then sun dry while still connected to the tree. When picked at the right time, medjools need no additional treatment or care before serving.

Nutritional Profile

Medjool dates only contain about 66 calories each. They are a good source of fiber and contain high levels of the essential minerals,potassium, magnesium, copper, and manganese. Most do contain a significant amount of fruit sugar, but this can make them a good alternative to more caloric desserts. In the Middle East where they grow wild, they are a popular food for nomadic travelers as they provide a lot of energy and healthful nutrients with the added benefit of being readily available.

How to Enjoy Medjool Dates

One of the easiest ways to enjoy medjool dates is to eat them on their own, either as an independent snack or alongside other finger foods like hard cheeses, crackers, and crusty breads. The dates do contain a pit, but it is big and generally very easy to remove.

The fruit’s large size also lends well to stuffing once the pit has been removed. Walnuts,almonds, and honeycomb are some of the more traditional things that cooks can put inside, but there is a lot of room for creativity. Some people put other fruits, small pieces of chocolate, or savory meats into the pit cavity in order to create a one-of-a-kind taste.

Use in Cooking

Medjool dates also feature in a number of recipes. Many North African stews call for sliced medjools, for instance, and they are commonly mixed with yoghurt for breakfast in countries like Iraq and Iran. They add sweetness to a number of cooked meat dishes and can also be incorporated into the batter of many different breads and baked goods.

Where They Grow

Date palms that give rise to medjool fruit are believed to be indigenous to the North African coast and Arabic Peninsula. Fossil evidence suggests that the fruits were enjoyed by ancient people in countries as far apart as Saudi Arabia and Morocco, and the land between these countries remains the primary growing area. Many California farmers have had some luck cultivating the trees, however, as have some people in Australia. They are often much harder to grow than other date varieties because of how sensitive the fruits are to air quality and soil moisture. They often take a tremendous amount of work to grow on demand, which is part of the reason for their relatively high price.

Cultivation at Home

The most basic way to grow a medjool date palm is to plant a pit and wait for it to sprout, though this is also the most time-consuming and potentially frustrating method. It can take up to 20 years for a sprouted pit to yield a tree that actually bears fruit. Home gardeners wanting to try their hand at growing medjools are usually better served by purchasing established plants from nurseries or local distributors or grafting branches from existing palms onto new plants. Trees typically need a lot of care, as well as close attention to sunlight and soil quality, in order to thrive. Some gardeners have had success cultivating the plants in indoor greenhouses, though the best fruits tend to come from trees exposed to more natural outdoor settings.

Here are a range of Medjool Dates you can buy online.


Highest Rated Sirtfoods

sirtfoodsThese are the highest-rated 20 Sirtfoods for a Sirtfood-rich diet  and how you can incorporate them into your daily meals.

  1. Bird’s eye chilli Also sold as Thai chillies, they’re more potent than regular chilis, and also more packed with nutrients. Use them to set off sweet or sour recipes.
  2. Buckwheat Technically a pseudo-grain: it’s actually a fruit seed related to rhubarb. Also available in noodle form (as soba), but make sure you’re getting the wheat-free version.
  3. Capers In case you’re wondering, they’re pickled flower buds. Sprinkle them over salad or roasted cauliflower.
  4. Celery The hearts and leaves are the most nutritious part, so don’t throw them away if you’re blending up a shake.
  5. Cocoa The flavonol-rich kind improves blood pressure, blood sugar control and cholesterol. Look for a high percentage of cacao.
  6. Coffee Drink it black – there’s some evidence that milk can reduce the absorption of sirtuin-activating nutrients.
  7. Extra virgin olive oil The extra virgin type has more Sirt benefits, and a more satisfying, peppery taste.
  8. Green tea or matcha Add a slice of lemon to increase absorption of sirtuin-producing nutrients. Matcha is even better, but go Japanese, not Chinese, to avoid potential lead contamination.
  9. Kale Includes huge amounts of sirtuin-activating nutrients quercetin and kaempferol. Massage it with olive oil and lemon juice to serve it as a salad.
  10. Lovage It’s a herb. Grow your own on a windowsill, and throw it into stir-fries.
  11. Medjool dates They’re a hefty 66% sugar, but – in moderation – don’t raise blood sugar levels, and have actually been linked to lowered rates of diabetes and heart disease.
  12. Parsley More than just a garnish – it’s high in apigenin. Throw it into a smoothie or juice for the full benefit.
  13. Chicory Red is best, but yellow works fine. Include it in a salad.
  14. Red onion The red variety’s better for you, and sweet enough to eat raw. Chop it and add to a salad, or eat it with a burger.
  15. Red wine You’ve heard of resveratrol: the good news is, it’s heat stable, so you can get benefits from cooking with it (as well as drinking it straight). Pinot noir has the highest content.
  16. Rocket One of the least interfered-with salad greens available. Drizzle it with olive oil.
  17. Soy Soybeans and miso are high in sirtuin activators. Include it in stir-fries.
  18. Strawberries Though they’re sweet, they only contain 1tsp of sugar per 100g – and research suggests they improve your body’s ability to handle sugary carbs.
  19. Turmeric Evidence suggests the curcumin in it has anti-cancer properities. It’s difficult for the body to assimilate alone, but cooking it in liquid and adding fat and black pepper increases absorption.
  20. Walnuts High in fat and calories, but well established in reducing metabolic disease. Smash them up with parsley for sirt-flavoured pesto.

Frequently Asked Questions-Sirtfoods

sirtfoodsAre Sirtfoods Suitable For Children?

The Sirtfood diet is a powerful weight-loss diet and not designed for children. However that doesn’t mean that children should miss out on including more Sirtfoods in their general diet for their remarkable health benefits and assist them in receiving a balanced and nutritious diet. Many of the recipes have been created with families in mind,including children’s taste buds.

Whilst the majority of Sirtfoods are extremely healthy for children the green juice is not recommended as it is  very concentrated  in fat-burning Sirtfoods. The caffeine as found in coffee and green tea should be guarded against as too with chillies. You may opt to keep things milder for children.

Should I Exercise During Phase 1?

Doing some moderate and regular exercise will enhance the weight loss and health benefits of Phase 1 of the diet. It is recommended you continue your normal level of exercise and physical activity through the first 7 days but stay within your normal comfort zone as very prolonged or too intense exercise may simply place too much stress on the body for this period. Listen to your body and let the Sirtfoods do the  hard work instead.

I’m Already Slim-Can I Still Follow The Diet?

Phase 1 of the Sirtfood Diet is not recommended for anyone who is underweight. The best way to find out if you are underweight is to calculate your Body Mass Index or BMI. There are numerous BMI such as this one online.If your BMI is 18.5 or less Phase 1 of the diet is not recommended. While many people desire to be super-skinny,the reality is that being underweight can have a negative affect on many aspects of your health,such as a lowered immune system,an elevated risk of weakening of the bones(osteoporosis) and fertility problems. Nevertheless if you are underweight, it is recommended that you integrate plenty of Sirtfoods into your diet to reap all their health benefits.

However if you are slim with a BMI in the healthy range of 20 to 25 by all means get started. You can still lose weight, become more toned and obtain improvements in your energy levels,appearance and vitality. The Sirtfood Diet is about promoting health as much as it is about losing weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Buckwheat The Sirtfood

Buckwheat, as one of the Sirtfoods what is it and how do you cook it? buckwheat sirtfood

What is Buckwheat ?
Despite its recent rise to prominence, buckwheat is actually an ancient grain with a long history. It has been eaten in Asian and Eastern European countries for centuries, but is now becoming increasingly popular in the west due to its many health benefits.

While buckwheat is often thought of as a cereal grain, it is actually a fruit seed that is related to rhubarb and sorrel. However, because its seeds are rich in complex carbohydrates, it is sometimes referred to as a pseudo-cereal.

While it is not a true grain, it can be used like one in cooking and is a delicious alternative to couscous, bulgur wheat, rice and pasta.

Buckwheat is super healthy, very versatile and, despite its name, it’s not actually related to wheat. It is naturally gluten free and should therefore be safe to eat for those with coeliac disease and gluten sensitivities.

Buckwheat  also comes in several different forms: buckwheat seeds (often called buckwheat groats, or just buckwheat), noodles, pasta and flour. The groats are available completely raw or sprouted and are also available toasted. The toasted buckwheat groats are commonly referred to as kasha and have an earthier, nuttier flavour than the raw buckwheat.

Why is buckwheat so healthy?
Buckwheat is high in protein and fibre. It is rich in many trace minerals, including manganese, magnesium and copper and is a good source of the B vitamins. It also contains relatively few calories (66 calories for an 80g cooked portion, 40g uncooked) and practically no fat. Buckwheat also ranks low on the glycaemic scale. In fact buckwheat is so packed with nutrients and antioxidants that it is often referred to as a “superfood”.

Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to a lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure and buckwheat may even help weight loss, reduce food cravings and improve diabetes.

It is an excellent source of plant-based protein, meaning buckwheat is an great choice for vegetarian and vegan diets.

How do you cook buckwheat?
Buckwheat is actually incredibly easy to cook, but our biggest piece of advice would be: be wary of following the packet instructions! The instructions on my packet of Tesco Buckwheat advised me to cook it for 30 minutes – well after 20 minutes it was a horrible tasting mush. Goodness knows what would have happened after 30 minutes! Less is obviously better. Our advice is to cook the buckwheat for 10 to 15 minutes in plenty of boiling water and drain. That’s it.

Whether you cook it for 10 or 15 minutes, it’s a matter for personal taste – a bit like pasta. If you want to add a little extra taste to your buckwheat, try toasting it in the dry pan for 2 to 3 minutes first before adding the boiling water, this will give you some extra nutty flavours and a richer, deeper taste, but is not necessary if you are in a hurry. (Also, do be careful when adding the boiling water to the pan that’s been toasting the buckwheat – it’s liable to bubble up like a volcano!).

Buckwheat can be stored in the fridge for up to 3 days, making it a great one to cook up a big batch and use for various salads throughout the week. It can also be frozen.
Does buckwheat taste nice?
Yes but it can be a bit of an acquired taste. We would encourage you to persevere if you don’t like it at first.

What do you do with buckwheat?
Buckwheat can be used in place of other carbs such as rice, couscous, potatoes or pasta. It can be used as a side dish for a curry or stew. It can also be used instead of rice, bulgur wheat or couscous in a salad. Buckwheat can also be used instead of rice to make a risotto-style dish.

 A recommended range of buckwheat products is available online.


What’s So Good About Sirtuins, Anyway?

sirtuinsThere are seven different sirtuins, named SIRT1 through to SIRT7, and while the exact function of all seven hasn’t yet been discovered, research shows that activating them can help in the following ways.

Helps control weight

Lab-based studies have not only shown how interventions that activate sirtuins tend to result in significantly lower body weights, but that sirtuins actually protects against weight gain, even in the presence of a high-fat diet.

Improves memory

As well as protecting neurons against the damage caused by diseases like Alzheimer’s, sirtuins boost memory and learning skills by enhancing synaptic plasticity, or how well the brain’s neurons are able to adjust their connections in response to new information.

Protects against diabetes.

Increasing sirtuin activity has been shown to have a protective effect against insulin resistance, a key risk factor for type 2 diabetes. By the same token, diminished sirtuin activity been linked to an increased risk of diabetes.Sirtuins make cells more insulin sensitive, which means they can remove more glucose from the bloodstream. Seeing as insulin resistance is the precursor to both diabetes and weight gain, this can also be good news for your waistline.

Fights cancer

The chemicals that work as sirtuin activators affect how sirtuin works in different cells, turning it on in normal, healthy cells, but switching it off in cancer cells, which encourages them to die.

Slows the ageing process

A number of animal-based studies have linked activating sirtuin proteins with a longer, healthier lifespan. Researchers say it’s thanks to the fact that sirtuins act as guardian enzymes that protect cells and slow down how quickly they age.

SIRTUINS also have a hand in a host of other health benefits. Including…

Sleep

Activating sirtuins helps your circadian rhythm, ensuring you produce the hormones for sleep and waking when you’re supposed to.

Memory

The Sirtfood turmeric has been shown to improve short-term memory and protect against cognition problems. Pack this into your morning juice for a brainier start to the day.

 

Lose Weight With Sirtfoods

Triggering your SIRT genes sparks a change in your metabolism that breaks down more fat cells. The activated SIRTs increase the amount of a neurotransmitter called norepinephrine, which is used by the nervous system as a signal to fat cells, telling them to break down fat. The signal telling the fat cell to convert fat to energy is stronger, increasing fat burning. This is the background to helping you lose weight with Sirtfoods. Foods that burn fat are the holy grail of weight-loss research and to lose weight with Sirtfoods is at the forefront of new research in this field.lose weight with sirtfoods

Want to burn more fat?

Drink green tea. Green tea combines SIRT activators and a (small) dose of caffeine. The caffeine enhances the effect of the SIRTs, meaning more fat is broken down.

There is a natural appetite suppressant effect when the body breaks down fat and the fat is converted into energy. This energy is used immediately by the body. This has a positive effect on how you feel, giving your energy levels a boost and decreasing the feelings of hunger.

Converting fat to muscle

Combining SIRTs with exercise boosts the fat-burning effect even further. If you exercise the energy released from fat cells is available for strengthening muscles.

In practice this means that if you follow the SIRTFOOD  diet and exercise several times a week you will not only lose weight, but you will look and feel leaner as some of the weight has been converted into muscle.

For absolute peak fat-burning performance when exercising, drink two cups of green tea (for the SIRTs and the caffeine) within one hour before or after exercise.